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Why People with Low Esteem Are Often Stuck in Bad Relationships

iStock/Thinkstock(WATERLOO, Ontario) — If you’re stuck in a rela­tion­ship that makes you mis­er­able, it could have to do with feel­ing mis­er­able about yourself.

Megan McCarthy, a PhD can­di­date at the Uni­ver­sity of Waterloo’s Depart­ment of Psy­chol­ogy, says that peo­ple with low self-esteem often find it dif­fi­cult to remove them­selves from an unhappy part­ner­ship because they can’t artic­u­late their con­cerns and worry about rejection.

McCarthy con­tends that the bot­tom line is that while those with low esteem are viewed as com­plain­ers, they seem to keep things to them­selves when involved in relationships.

There­fore, some peo­ple adopt a “for­give and for­get” kind of atti­tude when what they really should be doing is telling a part­ner what’s both­er­ing them.  “Fail­ing to address those issues directly can actu­ally be destruc­tive,” says McCarthy.

The next phase of her study, accord­ing to McCarthy, is deter­min­ing how to boost a person’s self-esteem to pro­mote more open dis­clo­sure in their relationship.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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Florida Boy Who Survived Double Lung Transplant Fulfills Firefighting Dream

Mon­key Busi­ness Images/Thinkstock(ORLANDO) — A 6-year-old boy has achieved his dream job: being a firefighter.

Cameron Wits­man, who was born with a lung defect, became an hon­orary fire­fighter on Fri­day in Eustis, Florida, a town about one hour north­west of Orlando.

Cysts grew in Cameron’s lungs before he was born, his mother Car­o­line Wits­man said. The dis­ease is called con­gen­i­tal cys­tic ade­no­ma­toid mal­for­ma­tion, Wits­man told ABC affil­i­ate WFTV, and when Cameron was four months old, he under­went a dou­ble lung transplant.

If he would not have had the trans­plant he would not be alive today,” Wits­man said. “There were quite a few instances where we didn’t know, but thank good­ness he pulled though all of those.”

Cameron, who has already sur­vived so much, rec­og­nizes the impor­tance of serv­ing oth­ers; he said what he likes about fire­fight­ers is “help­ing people.”

So Cameron’s new employer, the Eustis Fire Depart­ment, put him to the test.

His dream has always been to be a fire­fighter,” said Chief Rex Winn of the Eustis Fire Depart­ment. “And we tried to make that dream come true.”

The 6-year-old was given his own uni­form and went to work, shoot­ing down cones with a fire hose and even drag­ging dum­mies down the street, all with a huge grin across his face.

Pre­tend fires, he runs all these pre­tend calls at home, so to get this oppor­tu­nity for him has just been such a bless­ing, and I’m so thank­ful,” his mother said.

It’s just so amaz­ing to see that kind of fire in a young man,” Winn added. “That young man’s excite­ment and a dream that we can make hap­pen for him. That’s the good part of our job.”

Cameron wakes up with energy and he never wants to go to sleep at night,” his mother said. “He’s full of energy, vibrant smart, kind­hearted, loves help­ing people.”

While Cameron’s energy is up, he still has a sup­pressed immune sys­tem, accord­ing to WFTV, requir­ing him to be home-schooled and take sev­eral med­ica­tions a day.

There was a few times where I was called… ‘Cameron’s doing really bad, I don’t think he’s going to make it, you need to get here now,’” Wits­man said. “I can’t even put into words how amaz­ing it is that we’re here today and we’re doing well.”

And the cel­e­bra­tions didn’t stop at the fire house. Cameron was the guest of honor at a local parade today, dur­ing which he rode on a firetruck and handed out candy.

It’s such a heart­warm­ing feel­ing. So awe­some that they’ve taken this oppor­tu­nity to really make his day and make his years,” Wits­man said.

And how did Cameron feel about the new job? “I’m proud to be a fire­fighter,” the 6-year-old said.

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Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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Dallas Nurse, Ebola Survivor Nina Pham to File Lawsuit Against Texas Health Resources

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images(DALLAS) — Dal­las nurse Nina Pham is expected to file a law­suit against Texas Health Resources call­ing out the com­pany for their role in her hav­ing con­tracted Ebola last year/

In an exclu­sive story, the Dal­las Morn­ing News reports that Pham cites the company’s lack of train­ing and lack of proper equip­ment as part of the rea­son she con­tracted the dis­ease while treat­ing Ebola patient Thomas Eric Dun­can. She also says the com­pany vio­lated her pri­vacy , mak­ing her “a sym­bol of cor­po­rate neglect.”

Pham told the news­pa­per that she has night­mares, body aches and insom­nia as a result of con­tract­ing Ebola. “I wanted to believe [the com­pany] would have my back and take care of me,” she says. “But they just haven’t risen to the occasion.”

Pham told the Morn­ing News that she will file her law­suit on Mon­day, ask­ing for “unspec­i­fied dam­ages for phys­i­cal pain and men­tal anguish, med­ical expenses and loss of future earn­ings.” Per­haps more impor­tantly, Pham said, she wants to “make hos­pi­tals and big cor­po­ra­tions real­ize that nurses and health care work­ers, espe­cially front­line peo­ple, are important.”

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Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio

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Disappointing Year for Flu Vaccine Effectiveness

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — This season’s flu vac­cine may be even less effec­tive than ini­tially thought.

Health­Day News reports that the vac­cine is just 18 per­cent effec­tive against the dom­i­nant H3N2 flu strain, down from 23 per­cent ini­tially esti­mated by the U.S. Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion. Even worse, accord­ing to the CDC, the vac­cine may be just 15 per­cent effec­tive in chil­dren between the ages of 2 and 8.

Still, the vac­cine “does pre­vent lots of hos­pi­tal­iza­tions and deaths,” Dr. William Schaffner, for­mer pres­i­dent of the National Foun­da­tion for Infec­tious Dis­ease told ABC News. “We need to do the best we can with the vac­cine we have at hand.”

Schaffner did say that the flu appears to be abat­ing in all sec­tions of the United States.

As far as the dis­ap­point­ingly inef­fec­tive vac­cine, Schaffner said that it was “the worst year for the effec­tive­ness of flu vac­cine in decades. It will be bet­ter next year,” he predicted.

Chil­dren tend to get more viral ill­nesses than adults, Dr. Besser said, because they’re in phys­i­cal con­tact with each other and don’t have years of flu expo­sure built up.

The CDC also reports that the nasal-spray ver­sion of the vac­cine, which was “rec­om­mended espe­cially for young chil­dren,” Dr. Besser said, “is shown to not be effec­tive at all.”

It’s not exactly clear if it had some­thing to do with the mutated strain,” he said. “What it led to this week is the CDC voted that next year they will not rec­om­mend the nasal spray.”

It may be the end of Feb­ru­ary, but we’re still not out of the woods for flu season.

Flu sea­son is wind­ing down,” Dr. Besser said, but “there is still flu activ­ity around the country.”

We encour­age peo­ple who are sick to stay home from school and work, and cover their coughs and sneezes,” he added.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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Researchers Identify Possible Blood Test for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

AlexRaths/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers say a sim­ple blood test could help diag­nose chronic fatigue syn­drome — a chronic con­di­tion that affects one in four mil­lion Americans.

Accord­ing to the study, pub­lished in the jour­nal Sci­ence Advances, while one in four mil­lion have CFS, fewer than 20 per­cent are diag­nosed. Cur­rently, there is no test for chronic fatigue syndrome.

Researchers, how­ever, iden­ti­fied mark­ers in the blood that could help con­firm a diag­no­sis more quickly. There is even spec­u­la­tion that those same mark­ers could hold hints toward poten­tial ther­a­peu­tic tar­gets in the future.

The study’s lead­ers hope that they may have deter­mined a poten­tial bio­log­i­cal cause for CFS.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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Health Officials: 3 New Cases of Measles Linked to Emeril's at MGM Grand in Las Vegas

7Michael/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — The South­ern Nevada Health Dis­trict has iden­ti­fied three addi­tional cases of measles con­nected to a restau­rant on the Las Vegas Strip.  

The cases, in adults under the age of 55, are con­sid­ered to be the result of trans­mis­sion from an under-immunized staff mem­ber at Emeril’s New Orleans Fish House at the MGM Grand Hotel & Casino ear­lier in February.

The new cases are two staff mem­bers and a patron, accord­ing to health officials.

Two other cases con­nected to Emeril’s were reported ear­lier in the month, accord­ing to ABC News affil­i­ate KTNV-TV.  

An under-immunized worker was diag­nosed on Feb. 10, and an infant was diag­nosed with measles on Feb. 11. It is believed the infant spread the ill­ness to the worker.

One of the newly diag­nosed staffers was poten­tially con­ta­gious while work­ing shifts this month

The new cases bring to nine the num­ber of con­firmed measles cases in Clark County in 2015, accord­ing to health offi­cials.  These are the first con­firmed cases in  of measles in south­ern Nevada since 2011.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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Health Officials: 3 New Cases of Measles Linked to Emeril's at MGM Grand in Las Vegas

7Michael/iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — The South­ern Nevada Health Dis­trict has iden­ti­fied three addi­tional cases of measles con­nected to a restau­rant on the Las Vegas Strip.  

The cases, in adults under the age of 55, are con­sid­ered to be the result of trans­mis­sion from an under-immunized staff mem­ber at Emeril’s New Orleans Fish House at the MGM Grand Hotel & Casino ear­lier in February.

The new cases are two staff mem­bers and a patron, accord­ing to health officials.

Two other cases con­nected to Emeril’s were reported ear­lier in the month, accord­ing to ABC News affil­i­ate KTNV-TV.  

An under-immunized worker was diag­nosed on Feb. 10, and an infant was diag­nosed with measles on Feb. 11. It is believed the infant spread the ill­ness to the worker.

One of the newly diag­nosed staffers was poten­tially con­ta­gious while work­ing shifts this month

The new cases bring to nine the num­ber of con­firmed measles cases in Clark County in 2015, accord­ing to health offi­cials.  These are the first con­firmed cases in  of measles in south­ern Nevada since 2011.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

 

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1.1 Billion Young People at Risk of Losing Their Hearing, WHO Says

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — This just in from the World Health Orga­ni­za­tion: Your mother was right all along.

About 1.1 bil­lion peo­ple are at risk for los­ing their hear­ing, and half of 12– to 35-year-olds in high income coun­tries expose their ears to “unsafe” sound lev­els when they lis­ten to audio devices, the WHO announced Fri­day. And about 40 per­cent of them are exposed to “poten­tially dam­ag­ing” sound lev­els at music and enter­tain­ment venues.

As they go about their daily lives doing what they enjoy, more and more young peo­ple are plac­ing them­selves at risk of hear­ing loss,” said Dr. Eti­enne Krug, WHO Direc­tor for the Depart­ment for Man­age­ment of Non­com­mu­ni­ca­ble Dis­eases, Dis­abil­ity, Vio­lence and Injury Pre­ven­tion. “They should be aware that once you lose your hear­ing, it won’t come back. Tak­ing sim­ple pre­ven­tive actions will allow peo­ple to con­tinue to enjoy them­selves with­out putting their hear­ing at risk.”

The orga­ni­za­tion sug­gested lim­ited head­phone use to one hour a day and not spend more than 8 hours in work­places with 85 deci­bels of noise, like bars, night­clubs and sport­ing venues. Since those places nor­mally have 100 deci­bels of noise, the WHO noted that they can cause hear­ing dam­age in as lit­tle as 15 minutes.

Dr. Daniel Jethanamest, an oto­laryn­gol­o­gist at NYU Lan­gone Med­ical Cen­ter, said hear­ing dam­age hap­pens with repeated or pro­longed expo­sure to loud noises or a sud­den, intense loud noise, dam­ag­ing the tiny hairs inside the ears. Some hear­ing loss is tem­po­rary, but some is per­ma­nent. If you expe­ri­ence hear­ing loss or ring­ing, call your doc­tor, he said.

Here are some sound lev­els to keep in mind:

Head­phones can be cranked up to a vol­ume of about 110 deci­bels, accord­ing to the National Insti­tutes of Health. Though Jethanamest said there may be down­load­able cell phone apps to help you keep your vol­umes at safe levels.

Talk­ing at a con­ver­sa­tional level is 40 to 60 deci­bels, accord­ing to the NIH.

An elec­tric pen­cil sharp­ener is 71 deci­bels, accord­ing to the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Prevention.

An ambu­lance siren is 120 deci­bels, accord­ing to the CDC.

Fire­crack­ers are 140 to 165 deci­bels, accord­ing to the CDC.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

 

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1.1 Billion Young People at Risk of Losing Their Hearing, WHO Says

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — This just in from the World Health Orga­ni­za­tion: Your mother was right all along.

About 1.1 bil­lion peo­ple are at risk for los­ing their hear­ing, and half of 12– to 35-year-olds in high income coun­tries expose their ears to “unsafe” sound lev­els when they lis­ten to audio devices, the WHO announced Fri­day. And about 40 per­cent of them are exposed to “poten­tially dam­ag­ing” sound lev­els at music and enter­tain­ment venues.

As they go about their daily lives doing what they enjoy, more and more young peo­ple are plac­ing them­selves at risk of hear­ing loss,” said Dr. Eti­enne Krug, WHO Direc­tor for the Depart­ment for Man­age­ment of Non­com­mu­ni­ca­ble Dis­eases, Dis­abil­ity, Vio­lence and Injury Pre­ven­tion. “They should be aware that once you lose your hear­ing, it won’t come back. Tak­ing sim­ple pre­ven­tive actions will allow peo­ple to con­tinue to enjoy them­selves with­out putting their hear­ing at risk.”

The orga­ni­za­tion sug­gested lim­ited head­phone use to one hour a day and not spend more than 8 hours in work­places with 85 deci­bels of noise, like bars, night­clubs and sport­ing venues. Since those places nor­mally have 100 deci­bels of noise, the WHO noted that they can cause hear­ing dam­age in as lit­tle as 15 minutes.

Dr. Daniel Jethanamest, an oto­laryn­gol­o­gist at NYU Lan­gone Med­ical Cen­ter, said hear­ing dam­age hap­pens with repeated or pro­longed expo­sure to loud noises or a sud­den, intense loud noise, dam­ag­ing the tiny hairs inside the ears. Some hear­ing loss is tem­po­rary, but some is per­ma­nent. If you expe­ri­ence hear­ing loss or ring­ing, call your doc­tor, he said.

Here are some sound lev­els to keep in mind:

Head­phones can be cranked up to a vol­ume of about 110 deci­bels, accord­ing to the National Insti­tutes of Health. Though Jethanamest said there may be down­load­able cell phone apps to help you keep your vol­umes at safe levels.

Talk­ing at a con­ver­sa­tional level is 40 to 60 deci­bels, accord­ing to the NIH.

An elec­tric pen­cil sharp­ener is 71 deci­bels, accord­ing to the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Prevention.

An ambu­lance siren is 120 deci­bels, accord­ing to the CDC.

Fire­crack­ers are 140 to 165 deci­bels, accord­ing to the CDC.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
Copy­right © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

 

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New York Couple to Turn a Combined 212 Years Old

Amalia Thomas(NEW YORK) — A New York cou­ple mar­ried for 82 years will cel­e­brate a major mile­stone Sat­ur­day when the hus­band, Dura­nord Veil­lard, turns 108.

The momen­tous occa­sion means the cou­ple will be a com­bined 212 years old. Veillard’s wife, Jeanne, is 104.

He will tell you the secret to liv­ing a long life is all God,” a fam­ily friend told ABC News of Veil­lard. “He says that God has pre­served him so well and he wishes that every­one can live a long life as he did.”

Amalia Thomas, the close friend and busi­ness liai­son for the Veil­lard fam­ily, is field­ing the flood of requests for the now high-profile cou­ple who were fea­tured in the local news­pa­per Thurs­day and have since seen their celebrity skyrocket.

They’re like, ‘Who is next? What ques­tion are you going to ask?’” Thomas said. “They’re very excited.”

The Veil­lards, who live with their daugh­ter in Spring Val­ley, New York, are able to eas­ily take in all the atten­tion because, accord­ing to Thomas, they are still very sharp.

I don’t know how they do it but he’s very alert. He remem­bers dates. He can tell you the day he got mar­ried,” Thomas said of Dura­nord. “Jeanne is a lit­tle bit more quiet and laid-back.”

The cou­ple met in Haiti and mar­ried in Novem­ber 1932. Dura­nord Veil­lard, who worked as a lawyer and judge in Haiti, moved to the United States in 1967, fol­lowed by his wife in 1979.

They have five kids, 12 grand­chil­dren and 14 great-grandchildren, Thomas said.

Though Dura­nord has trou­ble with his eye­sight and hear­ing, the cen­te­nar­ian main­tains a daily exer­cise regime.

He does daily exer­cises in his chair, every sin­gle day,” Thomas said.

Veil­lard told The Jour­nal News he wakes up at 5 a.m. and does five to seven pushups, fol­lowed by tea, oat­meal and fruit for break­fast. The rest of the day includes fish and fresh veg­eta­bles for their meals, inter­rupted by many naps, accord­ing to the newspaper.

On Sat­ur­day, the Veil­lards will mark Duranord’s 112th birth­day with a party at their home with their family.

They’re very excited,” Thomas said.

Up next is Jeanne’s birth­day cel­e­bra­tion. She will turn 105 May 1.

Fol­low @ABCNewsRadio
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