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Childhood Diseases Can Also Sicken Adults

ABC/Rick Rowell(ARLINGTON, Va.) — Angelina Jolie missed the premiere of her movie Unbroken because she came down with chickenpox. Meanwhile, more than a dozen players from the National Hockey League were diagnosed with the mumps.Aren’t these childhood illnesses? Yes they are, but that doesn’t mean adults can’t get them. Dr. Aaron Glatt, a spokesman for the Infectious Diseases Society of America, explains there are several factors at work here, one being that vaccination rates have fallen across the country, meaning the chances of being exposed to chickenpox, mumps, measles...
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Gift-Giving to Kids Can Have Its Pitfalls

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — Parents love giving presents to their children almost as much as kids love getting them.However, when moms and dads use material possessions to manage their children’s behavior, it can create problems when their youngsters become adults themselves, according to researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Illinois at Chicago.Based on questions posed to 700 adults about their childhood relationships with their parents as well as how they were rewarded or punished, study investigator Marsha Richins said that people who constantly received...
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Men with High Levels of Testosterone Are Spicy Food Lovers

iStock/Thinkstock(GRENOBLE, France) — A manly man likes spicy foods, true or false?While it seems a bit preposterous, researchers at France’s University of Grenoble say that a man’s liking of hot and spicy grub may actually prove that he has higher levels of testosterone than guys who regularly pass on fiery foods.The proof, as it were, was in the mashed potatoes or rather, what the researchers offered participants to put on their potatoes.Some of the 114 men in the study, ages 18 to 44, opted...
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Warlike Metaphors Make the Cancer Fight Harder

iStock/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — Perhaps we’ve been going about the war on cancer all wrong.That’s the finding of University of Michigan researcher David Hauser, who says that metaphors used when describing people’s efforts to resist the disease, such as “fight” and “battle,” can detract from cancer-prevention behaviors.In one experiment, Hauser had more than 300 participants read one of two passage about colorectal cancer. One constantly referred to this cancer as an “enemy” while the other contained no such metaphors.Essentially, people who read the passage...
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